ALP Institute 2019

Professor with student

“Having the opportunity to take ALP has given me hope. I feel I have a good chance to succeed in college.”

CCBC ALP Student

 

The two day 2019 ALP Institute focuses on CCBC’s ALP model, and how that can translate to other institutions. Topics will include: acknowledging effects of non-cognitive issues on student success, backward curriculum design, Integrated Reading Writing (IRW) and critical thinking, coordination of the co-requisite course, including scaffolding activities for ALP students, active/collaborating learning, and grading.

Important Change in the ALP Model

Our ALP co-requisite course sequence has undergone an important change; the developmental co-requisite class is now a fully integrated reading and writing course, Academic Literacy (ACLT) 053. The ALP co-requisite structure remains the same. Students with upper-level developmental placements in reading and writing register for a 10-student section of ACLT 053 and are also mainstreamed, as a cohort, into a 20-student section of college-level composition (ENGL 101), joining 10 college-ready students. Both classes are taught by the same instructor. Continue reading

New CCBC Student Data: ALP Students Earning More Credits Than Students Who Take Traditional Developmental Writing Classes

A recently released CCBC student data study shows ALP students are earning more credits (persisting) when compared to students who took the traditional developmental writing classes.  The study looked at 3 cohorts of ALP and Non-ALP students who enrolled at CCBC in Fall 2010, Fall 2011, and Fall 2012.

The first data set compared the ALP and Non-ALP students who passed ENG 052 (CCBC’s upper- level developmental writing class) and earned at least 12 credits within 1 year.

New-CCBC-Student-Data-2

Breakdown by year:

Fall 2010       Total N=1,616

ALP                (N=288)                    33% (94 students earned at least 12 credits)

Non-ALP       (N=1,328)                  13% (172 students earned at least 12 credits)

Fall 2011       Total N=1,592

ALP                (N=549)                    32% (177 students earned at least 12 credits)

Non-ALP       (N=1,043)                   14% (147 students earned at least 12 credits)

Fall 2012       Total N=1,470

ALP                (N=590)                      37% (219 students earned at least 12 credits)

Non-ALP       (N=880)                      16% (138 students earned at least 12 credits)

 

The second data set compared the ALP and Non-ALP students who passed ENG 052 (CCBC’s upper- level developmental writing class) and earned at least 24 credits within 2 years.

New-CCBC-Student-Data

Fall 2010       Total N=1,616

ALP                (N=288)                      28% (80 students earned at least 24 credits)

Non-ALP       (N=1,328)                    13% (169 students earned at least 24 credits)

Fall 2011       Total N=1,594

ALP                (N=550)                       25% (136 students earned at least 24 credits)

Non-ALP      (N=1,044)                     14% (141 students earned at least 24 credits)

Fall 2012       Total N=1,470

ALP                (N=590)                       27% (160 students earned at least 24 credits)

Non-ALP       (N=880)                        14% (124 students earned at least 24 credits)

 

New CCBC Student Data: ALP Students Earning More Credits Than Students Who Take Traditional Developmental Writing Classes

A recently released CCBC student data study shows ALP students are earning more credits (persisting) when compared to students who took the traditional developmental writing classes.  The study looked at 3 cohorts of ALP and Non-ALP students who enrolled at CCBC in Fall 2010, Fall 2011, and Fall 2012. Continue reading