CADE 2018 – June 16th Breakout Sessions

10:30 AM-11:30 AM

5A. Increase Success Rate Using Capstone Problems in Accelerated Developmental Math Courses
Mathematics
Independence FPresenter(s):

Radhakrishnan Palaniswamy, Community College of Baltimore County

Abstract(s):

This project was aimed at increasing the knowledge of fundamental skills of accelerated developmental math students through a capstone problem, of a unit/module in developmental math. The strength of a capstone problem is to cover a full range of concepts into a single problem by connecting mathematical concepts and terminology to a real life problem which students can identify.

10:30 AM-11:30 AM

5B. Rethinking Mathematics Remediation: A Faculty-Led Project to Assess Placement, Redesign Curricula, and Streamline Mathematics Pathways
Mathematics
Independence GPresenter(s):

Marla A. Sole, Guttman Community College, CUNY
Edmé L. Soho, Hostos Community College, CUNY
Yevgeniy Milman, Borough of Manhattan Community College, CUNY

Abstract(s):

Developmental mathematics, which is designed to prepare students for credit- bearing courses, is instead a barrier to their success. To help students advance and ultimately graduate, faculty at three community colleges worked collaboratively to create innovative curricular pathways designed to streamline the time spent in remediation and align with students’ interests.

10:30 AM-11:30 AM

5C. The Golden 15 Minute Window of Opportunity: Addressing Non- Cognitive Issues in the Least Likely of Places
Non-cognitive Issues
Independence HPresenter(s):

Kerry Curran, Tompkins Cortland Community College
Eric Jenes, Tompkins Cortland Community College

Abstract(s):

The benefits of community building and backward curriculum design are obvious in the academics of ALP Writing Classes. But what if those principles were used to address the non-cognitive obstacles that arise in ALP courses? The interventions possible in the 15- minute break time between classes can further increase ALP success.

10:30 AM-11:30 AM

5D. Support Outside of the Program’s Scope: Helping Non-Targeted Students Find a Way In
Integrated Reading and Writing
Independence IPresenter(s):

Sarah Byker James, Community College of Philadelphia
Brian Goedde, Community College of Philadelphia
Elisa McCool, Community College of Philadelphia

Abstract(s):

ALP and contextualized courses improve outcomes for their targeted students, but what about the others in the classroom, the non-ALP students or the students whose major has changed? Join us to share resources that support students who are affected by the program, but are outside of the program’s scope.

10:30 AM-11:30 AM

5E. Co-requisite Courses and Writing Center Pedagogy
Writing
Lafayette ParkPresenter(s):

Dr. Margot Edlin, CUNY’s Queensborough Community College
Dr. Ilse Schrynemakers, CUNY’s Queensborough Community College
Jose Holguin, CUNY’S Queenborough Community College
Madiha Shameem, CUNY’s Queensborough Community College

Abstract(s):

This panel aims to explore strategies and questions with regards to how we, as ALP faculty and Writing Center administrators, should consider the purpose and structure of tutoring services for ALP students.

10:30 AM-11:30 AM

5F. Developing ALP Online: Faculty Course Developer Reflections
Integrated Reading and Writing
Farragut SquarePresenter(s):

Haleh Azimi, Community College of Baltimore County
Fawcett Dunstan, Community College of Baltimore County
Jay Trucker, Community College of Baltimore County

Abstract(s):

Have you considered revamping your online course to meet Quality Matters standards but are reluctant because you aren’t sure all that it entails? English and Academic Literacy (ACLT) faculty reflect on developing the fully online version of ALP, which is a co-requisite model of ACLT 053 and ENGL 101.

10:30 AM-11:30 AM

5G. * Open House with the California Acceleration Project: Resources for Transforming Remediation
Integrated Reading and Writing, Mathematics, Writing
Independence EastPresenter(s):

Katie Hern, Executive Director, California Acceleration Project
Summer Serpas, Assistant Director, California Acceleration Project

Abstract(s):

The California Acceleration Project supports California’s 114 community colleges to reform placement and remediation in English and math. This session will feature key resources to help with change efforts on your own campuses, including
research, student stories, placement guidelines, course materials, and nuts and bolts co-requisite information.

11:40 AM-12:40 PM

6A. Online Open Educational Resources for Accelerated Math Courses
Mathematics
Independence FPresenter(s):

Abderrazak Belkharraz (LaGuardia Community College)
Milena Cuellar (LaGuardia Community College)
Jeanne Funk (LaGuardia Community College)
Alioune Khoule (LaGuardia Community College)

Abstract(s):

This session describes LaGuardia Community College’s year-long plan toward adapting an open educational online platform for the accelerated/co-requisite developmental math courses. We present challenges identified along the way and the economic impact for LaGuardia students, curation, and evaluation of selected platforms, and preliminary outcomes of the pilot phases.

11:40 AM-12:40 PM

6B. Individualized Learning and Teaching in Accelerated Learning and Teaching
and
Advancing Human Rights Education in ESL
ESOL, Writing
Independence GPresenter(s):

Yanmei Jiang, Century College
and
Danielle Aldawood, Community College of Baltimore County

Abstract(s):

Strategically positioning myself as the coordinator of a “writing buddy system” in my writing class, I encourage students from all backgrounds to work together and learn from one another’s skills, experiences, and perspectives. Lesson plans, scaffolding assignments, and sample student papers will be shared.
and
Human Rights Education is noticeably underdeveloped within the field of English as a Second Language (ESL). However, this research demonstrates the positive linguistic, analytical and transformative impacts that human rights curriculum framed within critical pedagogy can have when presented through advanced composition and ALP courses for
ESL populations.

11:40 AM-12:40 PM

6C. The Road Taken and Not Taken: A Tale of Two ALP Studies
Writing
Independence HPresenter(s):

Troy Nordman, Butler Community College
Noreen Templin, Butler Community College

Abstract(s):

This co-presenter session will discuss the findings of both a qualitative and quantitative study of ALP in English at Butler Community College in Kansas. Utilizing data from both studies, the session will offer a multiple-methods, analytical overview of student success and failure factors.

11:40 AM-12:40 PM

6D. Faculty Mindset: How Our Perceptions Can Hurt or Help
Equity
Independence IPresenter(s):

Shannon Meers, Community College of Baltimore County
Ryan Donnelly, Community College of Baltimore County

Abstract(s):

A growth mindset helps students succeed, and helps faculty reflect on personal perceptions of students who lack college readiness. We apply Carol Dweck’s theories to faculty attitudes towards difficult students. We offer strategies to help recognize our own perceptions and work to develop ways for maintaining a healthy mindset with regard to our students.

11:40 AM-12:40 PM

6E. Research & Informational Literacy: Embedding a Librarian in the ALP Classroom
Writing
Lafayette ParkPresenter(s):

Lindsay Brand, St. Charles Community College
Julia Wilbers, St. Charles Community College

Abstract(s):

We will discuss specific ways vulnerable ALP students are introduced to the library’s academic resources helping them connect and fully engage in the college community. Then, we will share classroom activities integrating library instruction into the ALP classroom and culminating in a discussion of strategies from others’ campuses.

11:40 AM-12:40 PM

6F. Developmental Education Meets Dual Enrollment: ALP for High School Students
Dual Enrollment
Farragut SquarePresenter(s):

Henry Jackson, Ocean County College
Heather Jennings, Mercer County Community College
Marva Mack, Essex County College
Jennifer Martin, Salem Community College
Donna Rogalski, NJ Center for Student Success

Abstract(s):

ALP works for college students, why wouldn’t it work for high school students? Hear how four NJ community colleges are preparing high school students to be college ready and earn credit for English Composition 1. This panel discussion will showcase each college’s ALP model, implementation, preliminary data, successes and challenges.